Prospect Theater Project

Artist Lab

Presents

Page to Stage

Looking to enhance your playgoing experience?

Want to learn more about the plays we’ll see this season?

Read the play & join a discussion!

Scott Davis and Shannon Stevens

Interested?

Contact info@prospecttheaterproject.org

209.549.9341

Rough Crossing, by Tom Stoppard

Page 2 Stage Discussion: Sunday, January 29 following the play (approximately 4:00pm)

Our third play PTP brings us is the “freely adapted” from Játék a Kastélyban (Play At The Castle 1924), by Ferenc Molnár. Premiered 1984 (Lyttleton Theatre, dir. Peter Wood). Music André Previn, Lyrics Tom Stoppard.

Set on a transatlantic liner in the 1930s, two famous playwrights attempt to finish writing a musical and preserve the relationship of their composer and his fiancée, the leading lady, despite the efforts of her former lover and current co-star. The witty word-play is fast and furious, the action nominally about the process of playwriting and production, and like a farce, built on overheard scandal, errors of judgment, jealous impulses, and outright mistakes. And like much Stoppard, it leans into the absurd. It is a play within a play, a play in love with plays, a play about the joys of theatricality.

 

Trying to find a copy of this play?

 Contact the publisher directly.

Concord Theatricals: https://www.concordtheatricals.com/p/2924/rough-crossing

Click on Get The Script and choose the Acting Edition ($10 + shipping). It’s a 10-14 day turn around normally (and they will expedite for a price).

 This play was also published in 1991 in a volume with another adaptation, On The Razzle, which I found on the massive online store but which you can probably get from another online store with less surveillance.

 The original playwright, Hungarian Molnár Ferenc (1878-1952), migrated to the US in 1940, where he lived the rest of his life at the Plaza Hotel. You might know him from Liliom (source for Rogers & Hammerstein’s Carousel) and this play, Játék a Kastélyban, also the source of P. G. Wodehouse’s The Play’s The Thing (1926).

 We’ll be discussing this play after the matinee of the second week of performances, Sunday, January 29th, time TBA. Hopefully, we’ll be able to use the new Annex Space (more details forthcoming)!

 This will be a terrific show to brighten the January tule fog gloom!